What American accent do you have? | Comments

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  • I have never lived anywhere but the south, and mine came out 94% Northeast, most likely New York, which is kinda hilarious because for the last 35+ years in Sucks Carolina, every time I speak to someone new, the first thing I get is some version of "where are you from,up nawth somewhere?" Which is actually really annoying after awhile. Wouldn't be so bad if they'd let it drop, but nooooo, idiot people have to keep on and on trying to get me to tell them the "truth" about where I'm really from.

    roachiesmom
    1
  • I thought the quiz was decent. (I actually had to sit here and say some words aloud to figure some out!) Haha, I've always enjoyed talking about linguistics/dialect . The quiz said I was 86ish% North Central (compared me to Minnesota, Canada and the likes).. I'm from very northeast Iowa (20min from Minnesota, 40min from Wisconsin), so I think it did a good job!

    TayClaman
    1
  • Fun, but not a winner. I am definitely not Boston-bred; I know what a Boston accent sounds like and I'm not even close. Born in Pennsylvania and spent most of my adult life in or around Philadelphia. Those who truly know accents have me pegged for Philly (not South Jersey, which is a whole different kettle of fish) before I have three sentences out of my mouth.

    PhillyGlo
    1
  • the problem is that you lump all Southerners together- the deep south has a totally different dialect than say the mountain regions of the south- like the word Cot and Caught- which in the mountains is more like Cot in that it is basically Cotched- Mary, Merry and Marry are different also - in that Mary is more like Murry- Merry is more like Merry and Marry is something between the two but closer to Marry with a short a.. I know I grew up there and moved to the south-- and trust me those that live in Charleston speak a whole different form of English than anyone else in the country unless it is Boston..

    jazzcity
    1
  • I was rated as 100% Midlands, probably from southern Ohio or some such place. WRONG. The survey does not check the pronunciation of long /o/-- Midlands people say "ayo" while northerners like me just say [o] gliding to [u]. Another good test here would be to check pronunciation of "Ow!" Is it "ayow" as in the Midlands and all over the West, or [ah] gliding to [o]? Additionally, word choice is part of determining dialect (pop vs. soda vs. tonic vs. coke) and even grammar is. In one part of the country "might could" is a legitimate modal verb.

    mazchort
    1
  • How fun this was even if it's not 100% accurate. We Americans generally move around so much that I think it's very hard to pinpoint an accent unless someone stayed in a particular region their whole life. Mine was off of course. I've never lived in the inland north and am thoroughly annoyed by those who refer to soda as pop. :) I grew up in CT and then lived in Boston as an adult for a log time.

    Mvan6
    1
  • To Jerseygirl65: It's either "Inland North" or "Northeast", these are two different areas. They are a little vague as to exactly what Northeast means; I test as what looks like about 98% "Northeast" and slightly less "Inland North", whatever that means, although I learned to speak on Long Island but NOT in the parts where folks call it "Lung-GUY-lind aw-reddy" or say "Jeet/No/Jeet/No/Je et/No/Lesgweet" as the conversation of one person asking three friends if they had lunch yet or not. But although I lived most of my HS & adult life in NJ, I definitely don't say "Nih Joyzee, dah homa da cultcha luv-vahs" either, even though they do include New Jersey in "Northeast". It's all about "Which Exit?"

    C Ed Wright
    1
  • Interesting. I came out Midland. Yet I was born and raised in California, and have lived here over 6 decades. While my father was from the Midwest (Chicago), my mother's family has been in California since the 1800s.

    One small point, the options on merry, marry, and Mary assume that, if only one is different, that one is marry. Yet for me, Mary and marry are identical, but merry is (very slightly) different.

    wjca
    1
  • Totally off! I was born in Ft. Myers, Florida. My one grandmother was from England,the other from Chicago of German descent. My mother grew up in Pittsburg, my dad in Florida. Most people think I am from New York or "somewhere up north" though I can sound as southern as you'd like--or use any number of accents--Cuban, Mexican, several English, Irish, Scottish, German or French.

    Lillibet60
    1
  • I find this rather inaccurate, since it seems to assume that there is a distinct accent everywhere in the Northeast that differs from the "Midlands." I've lived in Western Massachusetts my entire life, and I got the Midlands. You probably aren't from New England if you don't realize that the east of Massachusetts, northern Connecticut, and other such places all bear the very neutral accent that you seem to think only "Midland" people bear.

    Monniemoo
    1
  • Said I am from the midland. Nope, Western Washington state, although I was born in Brit. Col. Canada. Here since age 11 however. However, I remember that we on the west coast were once the best to be hired for national radio/tv since we can be understood by all the rest of the country and that is so not true of people from, say, Arkansas. Remember one lady from there told me she was going to feed her kids "bald" weinies. I said all the ones I cooked were hairless! How did I know she meant boiled.

    Beverley
    1
  • Well, you guys really missed on me. I answered all the questions very carefully and was very sure of my answers. You came up with "Inland, North." Actually I am was born and raised in Eastern Washington State, where I currently reside. And, my parents, who raised me, were born and raised here also, so I didn't pick up a different accent from them, either. But it was fun anyway. Maybe you could stretch it to come up with Inland North, but then there is a comment about "Chicago", so I don't think that is what you had in mind.

    billygoatgruff
    1
  • I was born, raised, educated through college in Gulf Coast

    area of Louisiana. I've never been to Philly. Your

    text answer, ie., "Philadelphia," does not match the bar

    chart below it, which emphatically states that I have a

    Southern accent (true.) What gives? Many others seem to

    have never been to places which were identified as their

    origin of accent.

    caldreamn05
    1
  • What American accent do you have?
    Your Result: The West

    Your accent is the lowest common denominator of American speech. Unless you're a SoCal surfer, no one thinks you have an accent. And really, you may not even be from the West at all, you could easily be from Florida or one of those big Southern cities like Dallas or Atlanta.

    OMG How did it do this? I was born in the west(Oklahoma), raised in Florida(Jacksonvill e) and live in Atlanta!

    SherrieBC
    1
  • I was interested in taking the quiz because I took several

    classes on language and did a paper at Cal on American dialects.(In WWII era) At first I was confused by the designation of "Inland north". I was born and raised in California. However, I realized my father, a school superintendent, was born in Minnesota and moved to Los

    Angeles when he was about 12. Your quiz is amazing.

    murielchristen
    1
  • Your analysis is little off. I studied speech and pronunciation, and I know and can hear the differences in merry and Mary and marry...as a matter of fact one of the pronunciation excercises we worked on is "merry Mary married Harry" and making the distinction among the four accented vowel sounds, which is considered Good American Speech, not northeast or Philly. But the quiz is fun.

    ellenandron
    1
  • I got Midland or "no accent". I'm not from any of the states specifically mentioned, but it did say something about possibly being from larger cities in the south. I'm not from a big major city but I am from a large and growing city in the south. The only hints of an accent I ever have while speaking are always southern, because a lot of members of my family speak with a southern accent. I'm often told at family gatherings that I "speak all proper."

    crrazywutt
    1
  • Huh. I apparently have a Midland accent despite being born and raised in Chicago, going from there to college in Boston and from Boston to Manhattan, where I've spent the last 20 years in Manhattan).

    I believe it; all the questions on the quiz seemed like they each had only one answer I could possibly choose.

    I even have a guess how it happened; it's a little farfetched-seeming, but something has to explain it. (My father grew up in central Illinois, and while he moved to Chicago young and didn't have an accent I noticed, his relatives sounded (still do, the surviving ones) much more Southern than Northern. I guess I picked enough of it up on visits to soften the edges a bit. Cool.)

    jessiegtq
    1
  • Huh. I apparently have a Midland accent despite being born and raised in Chicago, going from there to college in Boston and from Boston to Manhattan, where I've spent the last 20 years in Manhattan).

    I believe it; all the questions on the quiz seemed like they each had only one answer I could possibly choose.

    I even have a guess how it happened; it's a little farfetched-seeming, but something has to explain it. (My father grew up in central Illinois, and while he moved to Chicago young and didn't have an accent I noticed, his relatives sounded (still do, the surviving ones) much more Southern than Northern. I guess I picked enough of it up on visits to soften the edges a bit. Cool.)

    jessiegtq
    1
  • I got Midland. I was born in Auburn Washington and lived in the Seattle area my whole life. The inaccuracy possibly came from the fact that my Grandfather spoke German and my Dad was born in the Dakotas. In addition I tend to over think things sometimes and make a conscience effort to pronounce certain words the way they are spelled.

    wubbledub2
    1
  • I'm from New Jersey, but...

    "You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.

    Well my dad's parents were from Pennsylvania and my mom is from Wisconsin, so that must be it.

    andrewdodd39
    1
  • I got: What American accent do you have?
    Your Result: Philadelphia

    Your accent is as Philadelphian as a cheesesteak! If you're not from Philadelphia, then you're from someplace near there like south Jersey, Baltimore, or Wilmington. if you've ever journeyed to some far off place where people don't know that Philly has an accent, someone may have thought you talked a little weird even though they didn't have a clue what accent it was they heard.

    The Northeast
    The Inland North
    The South
    The Midland
    Boston
    North Central
    The West

    Doglover
    1
  • Wow, my case is almost identical with bootleg127; I got the Bostanian as my accent and even though I have lived in Boston my entire life, I was surprised I got that as a result because I pronounce almost all my R's.

    I even have an issue with question no. 8 as well! Except I pronounce "Mary" and "marry" the same (mare-ee), but "merry" different (meh-ree). This was the only question that didn't have my pronunciation as an option.

    Deus ex Machina
    1
  • Nope.......Ya'll missed it entirely....the quiz indicates that I am probably from the Northeast ......... Wrong! ........ I am from South Carolina.....which goes to show that we are not all uneducated yokels down here! Southerners do know how to speak and properly enunciate. Mispronouncing words doesn't have a thing to do with where you live, nor does it have anything to do with a person's accent. Anyone can learn correct pronunciations of words. Inflection is a different thing altogether. Incidentally, I am proud of my southern drawl.

    WZF
    1
  • "You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.

    It is pretty accurate. I am from Indionapolis. Not exactly Southern Indiana, but close.

    nuke
    1

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