The place above our tiny blue dot in the black abyss

  • Locked due to inactivity on Aug 21, '16 3:54am

Thread Topic: The place above our tiny blue dot in the black abyss

alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced


More later, that's all I've made.
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
Second order of business, a complete list of possible planet types. I will post this in a bit, as it will take awhile to reformat.
Gravity
Joined: Jun 28, '15
Status: Novice
AreanLacustric, BathyPromethean, and Lokian are my favorites. What basic factors effect the diversity in the atmosphere of all these planets?

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That states most of what I already know in a much more formal way then I ever could present it. Now, I am curious and wish to use these factors to determine how each of your atmospheres are effected. Would you like to help?
Pure
Joined: Apr 7, '13
Status: Experienced

.
stupid newbie account....
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
Mainly the composition of the atmosphere and planet, it's distance from the star, and the size of the system, along with how much metal is in the system, and how much of the ices there are. (ammonia, methane, water, etc.), geologic activity, and how young he planet is. I'll be posting a complete list of planet types and it gives good reasons for atmospheric conditions.
Pure
Joined: Apr 7, '13
Status: Experienced
Hmm... thanks...
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
You wanna learn more after I post this? Theres a lot I can tell you, enough it'd probably be better just get a Borg information transfer node and connect my brain to yours and just feed it right to you XD But sadly I don't think any Borg ships are in this sector, and even if there were, I'm not prepared to fight them off XD
Pure
Joined: Apr 7, '13
Status: Experienced
Oh, I would say sure, but it would be a total waste.... I wouldn't retain anything you said...
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
Why do you think that? Anytime you need furutre reference just look here, I'm sure no mods will just come along and delete this, at least I hope not.
Pure
Joined: Apr 7, '13
Status: Experienced
Because I am unreachable in this vocation. I love this all, but something just doesn't click, I feel no passion... I have great interest, and I enjoy all of this, but I have no passion to learn so it would be pointless to try... maybe I am wrong, maybe indo have passion, maybe it is just covered by all my other passions... idk...

Okay,
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
heh, you're just lucky that if you ever do want to learn more you have someone at your disposal that got their spark for it at 5 years old and is now 14 almost 15 :-P
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
[i]Small Body Group

These are worlds with less than 0.0001 Earth masses, and thus not massive enough to sustainhydrostatic equilibrium. Typically they are restricted to sizes ranging from a few meters to tens of kilometers across.
VulcanoidalClass
These are rocky bodies inepistellarorbits, and marked by high metallic content. Rare, even unique mineralogical properties may develop because of their long term exposure (on the order of billions of years) to intense stellar radiation. First theoretically proposed by Charles Dillon Perrine in the mid-Twentieth Century.
AsteroidalClass
These are the archetypical asteroids, small and irregular bodies which are often found in specific belts or fields within a solar system, although they may also be found in eccentric solar orbits.
Metallic Type
Metal-rich, dense objects with a metallic content in excess of 50%. In most systems, these are the least common asteroidal bodies.
Silicaceous Type
Silicate-rich bodies with a silicate content in excess of 50%. These are fairly common in most solar systems.
Carbonaceous Type
Carbon-rich bodies with varying amounts of silicates and metals. They are by far the most common type of asteroid in most systems.
GelidaceousType
Ice-rich bodies with a frozen volatile content greater than 50%. However, unlike the Cometary Class, these bodies are in stable, relatively circular orbits which do not take them close enough to the local sun for volatile-loss.
AggregateType
Bodies which are essentially debris piles, held together by mutual gravity; their shapes may change over time, subtly or obviously, due to gravitational flexing. Their composition may vary, but for the most part they tend to be silicate-rich.
Cometary Class
Bodies with an ice content in excess of 50%, and which can be in orbits which carry them relatively close to their sun, causing volatile depletion and outgassing.
Passive Type
These are Cometary bodies which remain in distant stellar orbits, or are in the slow process of having their orbits transformed into those which will take them close to the stellar primary.
Oort Subtype
These are dormant bodies which never venture from the outer most regions of their sun's gravity well. Typically located in theOort cloud, these worlds are nearly unchanged from the time of their initial formation.
Kuiper Subtype
These are dormant bodies which never venture from their local sun'sKuiper belt, and remain relatively unchanged since the time of their initial formation.
Centaur Subtype
Dormant bodies which have been gravitational ejected from either the Oort cloud or the Kuiper belt, and found within the outer planetary region of the system. Their orbits are gravitationally unstable, and will likely become Active Type comets.
Active Type
These are Cometary bodies which are in orbits that take them fairly close to their stellar primary, resulting in volatile loss. These are the classical comets.
ActiveBrevis Subtype
Active bodies with orbits of less than 200 years Standard. They remain gravitationally bound to their stellar primary, but may still be subject to shifting orbits over hundreds of millions of years.
ActiveDirunitus SubtypeActive bodies with orbits greater than 200 years Standard, and remaining gravitationally bound to the primary sun.
ActiveEffigia Subtype
Cometary bodies in parabolic or hyperbolic orbits; that is, they pass close to their sun (or a sun) once, and are then flung out of the solar system forever.
Damocloid Type
Cometary bodies that have lost all of their volatiles, and in appearance look quite similar to asteroids. These bodies are typically quite ancient, although some are of average age, but have been trapped within very short period orbits for most of their active lifetimes.

Dwarf Terrestrial Group

Worlds with masses ranging from 0.0001 to 0.15 that of Earth. Most are massive enough to sustain hydrostatic equilibrium and support geological activity due to tidal forces, although the lesser examples are only roughly spherical and tend to be geologically quiescent.
Protothermic Class
Dwarf protoplanetary bodies which are still in the process of forming. Their surfaces are often partial to completely molten, and their atmospheres are typically thick with hydrogen and helium, as well as gases released by the massive geological activity; they still suffer major impact events. In general, their ages are less than between 10 and 100 million years. Prior to this, the Dwarf Terrestrial bodies are still accreting mass at a very high rate, and after this point the surface of these worlds, though still occasionally experiencing major impacts, have largely cooled, forming that world's earliest crust.
ProtoFerrinian Type
These are Dwarf Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces extremely hot or even molten. These worlds have a very high metallic content, and will eventually cool down into iron-rich bodies. Typically, these worlds are found in orbit of high mass or high metal stars.
ProtoLithian Type
These are Dwarf Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces extremely hot or even molten. These worlds are composed primarily of silicates, and are common in most systems.
ProtoCarbonic Type
These are Dwarf Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces extremely hot or even molten. They are carbon-rich, and are fairly common, though they tend to appear more in high-massed systems.
ProtoGelidian Type
These are Dwarf Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces hot, with high instances of geological activity. However, they form in the outer regions of a solar system, and so the primary building material is water. Thus they may possess significant atmospheres and even regions of liquid water on their surfaces as well, although as the world ages and cools, the atmosphere and liquid will freeze out, while the heavier silicates and metals will have since sunk to form the body's core.
GeoPassive Class
These are worlds which do not sustain continuous or intermittent geological activity, and whose surfaces are largely unchanged since the early period of planetary formation.
Ferrinian Type
These are dormant worlds composed primarily of metals, and are most commonly found orbiting F-type and earlier suns, or in high metallicity systems.
Lithic Type
These are dormant worlds composed largely of silicates. They are common in all star systems.
Janian Subtype
These are worlds tidally locked to their sun. Silicate rich, they also possess nightside ice caps, the result of trapped volatiles either native to the world and coming from the now vanished primary atmosphere, or delivered via cometary impacts over the eons.
Hermian Subtype
These are hot, silicate worlds with large metallic cores and relatively thin crusts. Early catastrophic loss of mass through major impacts early in the world's history are the typical cause for such geological configurations.
Vestian Subtype
These are silicate-rich worlds with ample evidence of a geologically active past, beyond the formation process. They typically possess no atmosphere, and are quite common as moons, or within inner solar system regions which experienced extensive tidal disruption early in the system's history.
Selenian Subtype
These are low metal, silicate-rich worlds, typically formed through the collision of two large bodies during the early formative period of a solar system. In such collisions, the higher massed world will absorb most of the heavy metals, while the lighter materials tend to aggregate into a separate body. As such, these worlds are most often found as moons around much larger bodies. They may also form normally with
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
within low metal systems. Those forming via collisions tend to have large amounts of evidence for a brief and active geological phase, the result of the formation of the body and subsequent major impacts. Mature Selenian worlds, however, are almost completely geologically inert, with only the occasional outgassing of volatiles that have been working their way to the surface for hundreds of millions of years. Such outgassing is very brief and locally powerful, but makes little impact on the world in general. Atmospheres are either entirely absent, or transient due to various circumstances, such as major cometary impacts or extremely rare major outgassing events.
Cerean Subtype
These are low metal, silicate-rich worlds which possess a significant amount of volatiles, typically in subsurface deposits or geological layers.
Carbonian Type
These are dormant worlds largely composed of carbon,carbides, orhydrocarboncompounds.
Gelidian Type
These are dormant worlds largely composed of ices, and are found beyond thesnowline.
StygianType
These areDwarf Terrestrial worlds which have survived the movement of their primary sun off of the main sequence, and its subsequent evolution towards a stellar corpse. The surfaces of these bodies show ample evidence of transformation due to the primary's stellar evolution.
GeoThermic Class
These are worlds which sustain regular or intermittent geological or geothermal activity due to temperature differences caused by highly eccentric orbits.
PhaethonicType
These are metal-rich worlds which experience intense volcanism as they approach their parent sun at extreme epistellar distances. While the planetary core may not be geologically active, the surface of the world itself is the driving force behind the intermittent geology as the crust continually melts and re-cools. This Type is named after Phaethon of Greek mythology, who drove his solar chariot too close to the Earth, scorching it.
ApollonianType
These are silicate-rich worlds which experience intense volcanism as they approach their parent sun at extreme epistellar distances. While the planetary core may not be geologically active, the surface of the world itself is the driving force behind the intermittent geology as the crust continually melts and re-cools.
SethianType
These are carbon-rich worlds which experience intense hydrocarbon volcanism as they approach their parent sun at extreme epistellar distances. While the planetary core may not be geologically active, the surface of the world itself is the driving force behind the intermittent geology as the crust continually melts and re-cools. This Type is named after Seth of Egyptian mythology, who protected the sun god Ra during his nightly journey through the underworld.
ErisianType
These are icy worlds which experience cryo-volcanism or crustal evaporation as they move in their elliptical orbit to within the snowline. This Type is named after Eris, the Greek goddess of chaos, as well as the largest example of such a body in the Sol System.
GeoTidalClass
These are worlds that sustain continuous geological activity due to tidal flexing. The level of activity can range from nearly constant resurfacing to regular cryo-volcanic outgassing. Some of these worlds are even able to sustain clement environments suitable to the development of simple or complex life.
HephaestianType
These are the most geologically active of planets, with surfaces that are almost entirely molten, and which change constantly. The entire planetary map can be utterly changed within a period less than a year Standard.
HebeanType
Named after Hebe, the Greek goddess of youth, these silicate-rich worlds are highly geologically active, but possess large regions of stability as well. The atmosphere can vary in thickness, with standing water typical only for those larger-massed bodies that have a high level of activity and a resulting thick atmosphere. The average age of the surface of these worlds is no more than a few million years old, much like active Terrestrial worlds.
PrometheanType
These are silicate-rich worlds that, through a naturally balanced amount of tidal flexing, has developed a full geological cycle similar to plate tectonics. Water oceans are a part of this process, and life, even advanced multicellular biomes, can be found on these worlds. From the surface, or from orbit, these planets are indistinguishable from the Gaian worlds. However, the processes which keep them habitable are far different.
EoPromethean Subtype
These worlds are roughly 800 million to 3 billion years in age, possessing a relatively warm and wet alkaline environment, with a thick atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide and methane, along with a hydrocarbon haze.. The first oceans will have formed during the earliest part of this period, as will have the earliest forms of life.
MesoPromethean Subtype
These worlds are roughly 3 and 4 billion years in age, possessing a relatively warm and wet alkaline environment, with a thick atmosphere that has little or no methane, but which remains thick with carbon dioxide. Single-celled simple life forms remain dominant, although towards the end of this period the first multicellular forms will typically begin to appear. Also towards the end of this phase, these life forms will typically begin to infuse large amounts of oxygen into the atmosphere, transforming the entire biosphere.
EuPromethean Subtype
These are Promethean worlds which can be characterized as being "mature", in that their biosphere is fully formed. They possess a rich nitrogen-oxygen atmosphere, and life has come to fill nearly every ecological niche possible. They remain geologically active, and have distinct divisions between terrestrial and oceanic crusts.
BathyPromethean Subtype
These are Promethean worlds which have formed with a large amount of water, the result being that nearly the entire surface if covered by deep oceans. The geological cycle of the world continues normally, however, with the occasional volcanic island or microcontinent being formed before the ocean erodes it away, within only a few tens of millions of years.
AmuPromethean Subtype
These are mature Promethean worlds, but they orbit at a further distance from their sun than other Promethean worlds, and have ammonia as a part of their biosphere. The oceans are heavily infused with ammonia, and the life forms present are reliant upon it as a part of their biochemical makeup. It is the presence of this ammonia which allows the surface water to remain unfrozen.
ThioPromethean Subtype
These are mature Promethean worlds, but they orbit at the furthest distance possible from their sun and remain biologically viable. This is due to the presence of large amounts of methane in the makeup of the planet, from the oceans to the life forms present. However, because of the low temperatures, life may not develop into complex forms for billions of years, possibly taking longer than the main sequence lifespan of their sun.
LokianType
These are the most active of carbon planets, with surfaces that are almost entirely molten, and a geology which changes on an almost yearly basis. They are carbon-analogues to Hephaestian worlds.
IdunnianType
Named after Idunn, the Norse goddess of youth, these carbon-rich worlds are highly geologically active, but possess large regions of stability as well. The atmosphere can vary in thickness, with standing liquid ammonia typical only for those larger-massed bodies which have a high level of activity and thus thicker atmospheres. The average age of the surface of these worlds is no more than a few million years old. They are the carbon analogues to Hebean Type worlds.
BurianType
These are carbon-rich worlds which, through a naturally balanced amount of tidal flexing, have developed a geo
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
logical cycle similar to plate tectonics. Ammonia oceans, life, and even advanced biomes can occur on these worlds, and from the surface they are almost indistinguishable from Amunian Type worlds, though the processes which keep them habitable are quite different. They are often considered to be the carbon equivalent of Promethean worlds. Liquid water is not possible on these worlds, even when mixed with ammonia; water ice does occur, and is typically rock-hard, forming the bulk of the crust and mantle.
AtlanType
These are icy worlds which, through a naturally balanced amount of tidal flexing, has developed a cryo-geological cycle similar to plate tectonics. Methane oceans, methane-based life, and even advanced biomes can occur on these worlds. On the surface they are almost indistinguishable from Tartarian Type planets, but the processes which keep them habitable are far different. They are considered methane-equivalents to Promethean worlds. Liquid water is not possible beyond thermal regions on these worlds, even when mixed with methane, and instead occurs as granite-hard deposits, forming the bulk of the crust and mantle.
Plutonian Type
These are tidally stretched icy worlds which exhibit varying degrees of cryo-volcanic and other forms of geological activity. They exist in the outer regions of solar systems, typically as moons to Jovian worlds, although independent bodies may arise as well.
Europan Subtype
These worlds are tidally stretched to the point of forming subsurface oceans, which can range from being a thin slushy layer less than a kilometer thick, to great liquid water oceans hundreds of kilometers deep. The surface of the planets are covered with icy crusts, often exhibiting deformations indicative of the oceans below.
Enceladusian Subtype
These are tidally stretched icy worlds, their surfaces smooth and relatively crater free due to outgassing of volatiles from subsurface reservoirs. Surface ridges and grooves cover much of the slowly dynamic surface, although there are more stable, cratered regions as well. The reservoirs themselves exist as isolated pockets of semi-liquid water, maintained as such by the slow tidal flexing of the world. Indeed, the tidal flexing which creates these worlds is of a type far less powerful than that which creates Europan worlds.
Iapetean Subtype
These are tidally stretched icy worlds, rich in carbon materials, which are marked by extensive upwellings of hydrocarbons. The surfaces of these worlds are typically quite splotchy as the ice contrasts with the extremely dark hydrocarbon sediments. Major rift zones and upwelling regions are also formed by this activity, built up into tremendously tall ridges and mountains by the deposition of the heavier materials.
Tritonic Type
These are tidally stretched icy worlds marked by cryo-volcanic outgassing, although most of the surface is geologically stable. The atmosphere varies in thickness, but typically is quite thin, if present at all. Standing bodies of liquid methane are possible, although rare, typically being present only near cryo-thermal regions, and when the atmosphere is thick.
GeoCyclicClass
These are worlds which possess an active geology, but which occur on a cyclic basis, often over a span of hundreds of millions of years. The driving force behind this cycle tends to be a slow build up of geothermal energy, resulting in a short active phase following a long quiescent phase. Other mechanisms may also be responsible.
AreanType
These are silicate-rich worlds which typically have relatively quiescent planetary cores. Their atmospheres range from thick and volatile-laden to almost vanishingly thin. In their youth they may have begun a system of plate tectonics, but the lack of a permanent presence of liquid water on the surface quickly arrested that, leaving the surface barren. The slow build up of geological energy, however, will eventually lead to much more clement conditions, and may harbor the development of simple life, or even more complex forms if there is enough time. This movement from cold and dry to warm and wet conditions is called aSisyphean Cycle, and can conceivably be maintained for billions of years.
MesoArean Subtype
These are Arean worlds with intermittent geological activity, with periods of freezing and thawing, as well as massive and sudden floods and the growth of glaciers and ice caps. They represent the rise to and fall from the height of geological activity in the Sisyphean Cycle.
EuArean Subtype
These Arean worlds are the quiescent, cold, and dry phase of the Sisyphean Cycle. Their surfaces are barren and will have accumulated a large number of impact craters, while their atmospheres will have largely eroded away to only a thin covering of carbon dioxide. There may be some residual geological activity, and even pockets of extremophile life, typically deep beneath the surface, but for the most part these worlds can be considered to be "dead".
AreanLacustric Subtype
These are Arean worlds at the height of their Sisyphean Cycle, with wet and clement surfaces. Simple life is abundant, and on those more massive worlds where this phase lasts longer, more complex forms might develop. The atmosphere is thick with carbon dioxide, powered by the extensive geological activity. At its height, these worlds may be too warm for polar caps.
UtgardianType
These are carbon-rich worlds which have relatively quiescent cores and surfaces rich with ammonia. Their atmospheres range from thick to only moderately so, never becoming exceedingly thin due to the distances of such worlds from their primary sun, and the ease which cold temperatures retain atmospheric gases. The slow build up of geological activity brings these worlds from relatively dry conditions to a state where the surface is marked with liquid ammonia seas, rivers, and possibly even ammonia-based life. ThisRagnarokian Cyclealternates over tens of millions of years, sometimes hundreds of millions, and it could indeed last for billions of years.
MesoUtgardian Subtype
These are Utgardian worlds with intermittent geological activity, their surfaces either slowly drying out, or marked by the thawing of ammonia reserves. They mark the rise and fall from the height of this activity cycle, and thus can have dynamic surfaces.
EuUtgardian Subtype
These are Utgardian worlds which are the quiescent and dry phase of the Ragnarokian Cycle. Their surfaces are barren, and the lack of activity lends towards the accumulation of impact craters. The atmospheres will have thinned somewhat due to the lack of surface activity, but because of the cold temperatures typical for their orbital position, they still remain thicker than normal, and are rich in methane. The surface becomes dominated by Aeolian forces. Any advanced life that had previously managed to evolve will go extinct, although the more primitive and hardy microscopic forms will remain, typically deep beneath the surface.
UtgardiLacustric Subtype
These are Utgardian worlds at the height of their activity cycle, and which are resplendent with seas and even oceans of liquid ammonia. Their atmospheres are quite thick, and the environment is warm, relatively speaking. Life, largely dormant before hand, will expand across the surface, and given enough time may even diversify into more advanced multicellular forms. This phase of the cycle may last tens of millions of years, or more, largely depending on world mass and the amounts of heavy metals present.
TitanianType
These are carbon-rich worlds which have relatively quiescent cores and surfaces rich with methane. Their atmospheres, because it is so cold and the gases so easily retained in their distant orbital positions, are almost always thick with methane and hydrocarbons. A greenhouse effect caused by methane is present, but largely negligible due to the
alex3000
Joined: Jul 12, '14
Status: Experienced
distance from the parent sun. Over time, and because of the lack of heavy geological activity, the atmosphere may slowly diminish, turning the world into a frozen body over the course of several billion years. Only renewed activity will reform the greenhouse environment, and the seas will again thaw. ThisTitanomalchian Cyclealternates over tens of millions of years, sometimes hundreds of millions, and it could indeed last for billions of years.
MesoTitanian Subtype
These are Titanian worlds with intermittent geological and cryo-volcanic activity, their surfaces either drying out and freezing, or marked by the thawing of methane reserves. These worlds mark the rise and fall from the height of this cycle, and their surfaces have the potential for being quite dynamic.
EuTitanian Subtype
These are Titanian worlds which are the quiescent and dry phase of the Titanomalchian Cycle. Their surfaces are barren, and the lack of activity lends itself towards the accumulation of impact craters. The atmospheres will become less dynamic during this phase, but will experience relatively little loss of mass overall. The surfaces become dominated by Aeolian forces. Any advanced life that had managed to evolve during the active phase will likely go extinct, leaving only the more hardy extremophile forms.
TitaniLacustric Subtype
These are Titanian worlds at the height of their activity cycle, and which are resplendent with seas and even oceans of liquid methane. Their atmospheres are quite thick with extensive hydrocarbon hazes, and the environment is warm, relatively speaking. Life has the potential for developing into complex forms, but because of the cold environment, this is not very common. This phase of the cycle may last tens of millions of years, or more, largely depending on world mass and the amounts of heavy metals present.

Terrestrial Group

These are rocky worlds ranging from 0.02 to 5.0 Earth masses. These worlds are massive enough to clear out their orbital zones and/or sustain continuous geological activity. This activity also maintains a substantial atmosphere.
ProtoActive Class
These are Terrestrial protoplanetary bodies which are still in the process of forming. Their surfaces are often partial to completely molten, and their atmospheres are typically thick with hydrogen and helium, as well as gases released by the massive geological activity; they still suffer major impact events. In general, their ages are less than between 10 and 100 million years. Prior to this, the Terrestrial bodies are still accreting mass at a very high rate, and after this point the surface of these worlds, though still occasionally experiencing major impacts, have largely cooled, forming that world's earliest crust.
ProtoLithicType
These are Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces extremely hot or even molten. These worlds are composed primarily of silicates, and are common in most systems. They retain atmospheres of varying densities, rich in hydrogen and helium.
ProtoCarbonianType
These are Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces extremely hot or even molten. They are carbon-rich, and are fairly common, though they tend to appear more in high-massed systems. Their atmospheres are typically rich with hydrogen, helium, and primordial methane.
ProtoGelidic Type
These are Terrestrial bodies which are still in the process of forming, their surfaces hot, with high instances of geological activity. However, they form in the outer regions of a solar system, and so the primary building material is water. Thus they may possess significant atmospheres and even regions of liquid water on their surfaces as well, although as the world ages and cools, the atmosphere and liquid will freeze out, while the heavier silicates and metals will have since sunk to form the body's core.
Epistellar Class
These are Terrestrial planets tidally locked to their stellar primary,with surface conditions made dynamic by geological activity, and/or atmospheric dynamics.
JaniLithicType
These are rocky, dry, geologically active worlds with greatly varying degrees of geological activity. As such, their atmospheres are also quite varied, but typically are primarily composed of carbon dioxide.
VesperianType
These are silicate worlds with continuous geological activity which may be plate tectonics, or a similar mechanism. Because of their proximity to cooler late k-type or M-type stars, they have temperatures suitable for the development of life. And while a large number of circumstances must be met for these worlds to be life bearing, circumstances which are rare, the sheer number of stars which can host these worlds makes the presence of Vesperian planets only slightly less common than Gaian worlds.
JaniVesperian Subtype
These are atypical, borderline Vesperian worlds with either most of the surface water frozen out on the nightside, or the volatiles having been depleted during the planetary formation process. The native biology is sustained by the thickened atmospheres, but due to the lack of large bodies of water they suffer major climatic extremes. Most of the surface water will be located in the twilight regions, as well as the biomass.
EuVesperian Subtype
These are mature Vesperian worlds which typically support lush biomes. Depending on continental configuration, and the amount of surface water, there may be a nightside ice cap of varying size and thickness. Regardless, the oceans and, to a somewhat lesser extent, the atmosphere aid in evenly distributing the heat of the sun across the globe, leaving only extreme temperatures under the sun and near the nightside polar cap.
BathyVesperian Subtype
These are Vesperian worlds of high temperature and deep oceanic basins, their atmospheres quite dense. Because of this, they tend to have complete cloud cover, and a lack of any sort of nightside ice cap. The atmosphere and ocean tends to evenly distribute global temperatures, although there may be an oceanic "dead zone" near the surface directly underneath the sun. Temperatures in this region can easily reach nearly 250 degrees Fahrenheit.
ChloriVesperian Subtype
These are Vesperian worlds which have biospheres that releases free chlorine through photosynthesis. Such worlds can only form when there is a high percentage of hydrogen chloride in addition to the water present. Such worlds are believed to be exceptionally rare, especially when taken with the relative rarity of Vesperian worlds themselves.
Telluric Class
These are Terrestrial worlds whose conditions do not support a continuous hydrological cycle of any sort. They are typically subject to major resurfacing by literally cataclysmic events over the course of several hundred million years, although some worlds may continue such resurfacing at a slow but constant pace. Because of the constant geological outgassing, the atmospheres are typically quite dense, and produce major greenhouse effects.
PhosphorianType
These are the most extreme of Telluric worlds. They form much closer to their sun than other Telluric worlds, and have correspondingly higher temperatures. Because of the extreme solar heat, there is little to no cloud cover, although the atmospheres remain quite dense.
CythereanType
These are the archetypical Telluric worlds, their trademark thick atmospheres having been formed by unrelenting geological activity and the buildup of major greenhouse gases over hundreds of millions of years. While these worlds may form with an appreciable amount of water, the formation of this hothouse environment will eventually cause it all to evaporate and breakdown into its component atoms. Tectonic activity, which may have been in the formative stages, ceases, but the associated geology continues unabated. Eventually the build

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